don't die press

Decolonizing, feminist poetry: Weed Apologue, a new e-chapbook

$7.50

bpNichol chapbook award nominee, 2018
Pushcart Prize nominee, 2015 (parts I and II)

“Krahn’s poetry condemns Canadian colonialism and its impact on [I]ndigenous women and the environment while weaving language in a way that cannot be anything but like a so-called weed: insistent, seemingly effortless, hardy, and, ultimately, beautiful.” –Terrence Abrahams, author of a wish

This is a digital pdf e-chapbook that can be read on the computer with a pdf reader or on a tablet or phone with a free e-reader such as Bluefire or Adobe Acrobat. (31 pp.)

20% of the proceeds for Weed Apologue will be donated to the iHuman Youth Society, an organization in Edmonton, Alberta that offers care, creativity, and resilience programming for Indigenous youth, as well as traditional parenting support for youth mothers.

If paying is a hardship for you, please contact admin [at] dontdiepress.org.

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Description

Decolonizing feminist poetry in the experimental stylings of S/tick Managing Editor Sarah-Jean Krahn: Weed Apologue, a new e-chapbook from don’t die press.

bpNichol chapbook award nominee, 2018
Pushcart Prize nominee, 2015 (parts I and II)

From the text:

Weed Apologue reveals a longstanding colonization: of landscapes, of places, and of bodies, both Worded and Real. Standing in the mortar of the quintessential may belie the most reckless compilation of an optimistic poet. It is all part of the voluntary thrall of Filling Holes, a voice to be Clavered & Whelmed.

About Weed Apologue

In this blazing long poem, Sarah-Jean Krahn–otherwise known as “A Crotchety Robber”–responds to the quintessential prairie poetry set out by Robert Kroetsch in Seed Catalogue. Sarah-Jean shows how the violent colonization of the country called Canada results in some very important people gone missing. Namely, women, and especially Indigenous women. Meanwhile, the accompanying degradation of Alberta’s natural beauty by industrial forces that choose to remain ignorant gnaws at the insides of those who remain.

What are readers saying?

“Stunning, extraordinary and highly accomplished. This is the sort of work that people will be talking about in the future as a key work of Canadian literature.”
“You’ve basically created the darkest timeline of Seed Catalogue.
“Krahn’s poetry condemns Canadian colonialism and its impact on [I]ndigenous women and the environment while weaving language in a way that cannot be anything but like a so-called weed: insistent, seemingly effortless, hardy, and, ultimately, beautiful.” –Terrence Abrahams, author of a wish

Weed Apologue is both evocative and provocative, a courageous revision of history and daring vision of a world that absolutely must change course.